CELL at UIndy

Center of Excellence in Leadership of Learning

Part IIa: Certification Rubric

Use the ICPBL Certification Rubric as both a guide for what is being reviewed and as a check list for submitting accurate and specific materials required. The rubric serves for the review team as a measure of completion of materials and artifacts submitted.

Download the rubric as a PDF.

The successful PBL facilitator exhibits…

Progressing Practice

Shows rudimentary PBL practices & implementation

Proficient Practice

Shows competent PBL practices & implementation in some areas

Advanced Practice

Shows exemplary PBL practices & implementation across areas

Domain 1: Project Planning & Instruction
1.1 Content Knowledge and Skills Unit Planning Form(s) include correct factual content with some elaboration of “big ideas” that address conceptual understanding. Video teaching segments(s) provide evidence of correct factual content.Students learn minimal content and students can complete the project without learning new content. Unit Planning Form(s) and video teaching segment(s) provide evidence of conceptual content development.The project demands breadth and depth of specific knowledge of central concepts. Unit Planning Form(s) and video teaching segment(s) show clear integration of interdisciplinary content.Unit demonstrates a range of content knowledge that is clearly focused on conceptual development and integrated through workshops/lessons.Content knowledge and skills are aligned with 21st Century Skill development.
1.2 Authenticity & Relevancy Students can see real world applications for what they will be doing.The problem or question has meaning to the students. Students can make connections between what they are doing and how to tackle real world problems. Unit is authentic and relevant for students and may address community-driven issues.Adults in the “real world” are likely to tackle the problem or question addressed by the project.Project requires students to synthesize information, and create and present unique ideas.
1.3 Designed with the End in Mind   Workshops are sequenced and aligned with intended learning targets, standards, and assessments a majority of the time.Appropriate learning targets, standards, and assessments are aligned and sequenced a majority of the time. Appropriate learning targets, standards, and assessments are clearly and logically aligned and sequenced within each lesson/workshop. Alignment may be less consistent across the scope of the project.The project suggests a clear vision of possible learning outcomes for the challenge (issue/question) addressed, and includes preparation for possible issues that students may encounter. Appropriate learning targets, standards, and assessments are clearly and logically aligned and sequenced within each lesson/workshop and across the project.The project suggests a clear vision of possible learning outcomes for the challenge (issue/question) addressed, and includes preparation for possible issues that students may encounter. The design also maintains appropriate flexibility to accommodate students’ interests, issues, and questions as they arise.The project plan acknowledges that students may complete the challenge in ways not previously envisioned by the teacher.
1.4 Entry Events & Driving Question The entry event introduces terms, skills, and concepts that students have not learned before.The entry event and DQ are authentic, linked to standards, and engaging for some students.After launching the entry event, students are able to develop a “need to know” list that includes fundamental content questions. The entry event gives the students clues to where they might find the answers to their “need to knows.”Entry event creates interest for most students.The entry event is a written document to launch the project.The DQ is based on specific national content standards.

The entry event introduces terms, skills and concepts that the students have not learned before.

The entry event and DQ are authentic, linked to standards, and engaging for most students.

After launching the entry event, students are able to develop a “need to know” list that includes fundamental content questions, and they can use the event to guide their inquiries.

Students are able to develop a “need to know” list that includes higher order thinking questions from the entry event.Entry Event creates a stir of excitement among the students.The entry event includes something other than a written document to launch the project and/or involves authentic experts/audiences who will participate in significant ways.There is a well-defined and clear DQ that is derived from specific national content standards.

The entry event introduces terms, skills and concepts that the students have not learned before.

The entry event and DQ are authentic, linked to standards, and engaging for most students.

After launching the entry event, students are able to develop a “need to know” list that includes fundamental content questions, and they can use the event to guide their inquiries.

1.5 Inquiry and Student Voice/Choice The candidate organizes students’ to-do lists and plans how students should tackle the challenge.With teacher guidance, students use a few high-performance work and organization skills (e.g., working in teams; using technology appropriately; communicating ideas; collecting, organizing, and analyzing information).Project(s) include minimal opportunities for students to demonstrate creative solutions to the challenge. Project(s) contain major phases of the challenge, and helps the students organize their to-do lists without overly prescribing the tasks.With teacher guidance, students use multiple high-performance work and organization skills (e.g., working in teams; using technology appropriately; communicating ideas; collecting, organizing, and analyzing information).Project(s) include multiple opportunities for students to provide creative solutions to the challenge.Candidate generally reflects on ways he/she provided voice and choice during the implementation of the project. Project(s) contain major phases of the challenge, and helps the students organize their to-do list without overly prescribing the tasks.Students formally use self-management skills (e.g., developing a work plan; prioritizing pieces of work; meeting deadlines; identifying and allocating resources) to improve their team’s performance.Project(s) include multiple opportunities for students to provide creative solutions to the challenge, and allows students to contribute individually to the group according to their respective talents and skills.Candidate reflects on specific ways he/she provided voice and choice during the implementation of the project.
1.6 Community Partnerships There is an appropriate audience for the student work.Students have limited contacts with adults outside of school (e.g., guest speakers).The teacher uses role-playing or other staff members to simulate “expert” contact. 

 

 

 

 

The project externalizes the challenge by defining an audience/evaluator(s) other than the teacher.Relevant and appropriate community partners are involved in the project.Adults outside of school provide students with a sense of the real-world standards for the type of work.Candidate describes partnership information (i.e., name, organization, role/duty of partnership) of those involved in the project(s).

 

The project externalizes the challenge by defining an audience/evaluator(s) other than the teacher.Relevant and appropriate community partners are involved in the project.Students have multiple contacts with adults outside of school who have expertise and experience and who can ask questions, provide feedback, and offer advice. Partners are integrally involved throughout the project.Candidate describes partnership information (i.e., name, organization, role/duty of partnership) of those involved in the project(s).
1.7 21st Century Skills (Critical thinking, communication, collaboration, technology use, innovation, self-direction, persistence)  Candidate demonstrates technology as a tool to scaffold and enhance learning.  Shows awareness of integrating content, pedagogical, and technological knowledge.Plans provide some evidence of student engagement in tasks that require critical thinking.  Work challenges only some of the students (“one size fits all”). 

 

 

 

 

 

Students present and defend solution to a real audience for the student work. Students can demonstrate content standards with 21st Century Skills.Candidate demonstrates technology as a tool to scaffold and enhance learning. Shows evidence of integrating content, pedagogical, and technological knowledge.Candidate provides evidence of student engagement in tasks that require a range of critical thinking skills. Work is differentiated in order to challenge all students. Students present and defend solution to a real and appropriate audience for the student work. Students can demonstrate content standards with 21st Century Skills.Candidate embeds technology into instruction seamlessly. Content, pedagogical, and technological knowledge fully evidenced.Candidate not only engages students in work that is challenging and relevant, but also empowers students to take responsibility and charge of their own learning.Students develop new habits of mind (e.g., questioning and posing problems; precision of language and thought; persistence).
1.8 Differentiation    

 

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriately uses of best practices but number and variety are limited.  Practices are geared to whole group instruction, little flexibility in implementation.Plans show differentiation in at least two areas: content, process, product, and/or flexible grouping. Appropriately uses of a variety of best practices.Practices are used flexibility for both whole group and individual learning.Differentiates in at least three areas: content, process, product, and/or flexible grouping. If required (e.g., IEP, EL), accommodations to meet specific learner needs are evident.  Workshops, mini-lessons, and scaffolding activities clearly show the teacher’s anticipated student NTKs.The teacher enables each student to construct meaning and concepts through learner-centered lessons.Differentiated teaching is seamlessly embedded in all aspects of instruction (content, process, product, and groupings). If required (IEP, EL), accommodations to meet specific learner needs are evident. 

 

 

1.9 Group Collaboration Students work together but developing collaborative or teamwork skills are not part of the project(s). Students work together in small structured learning groups with clearly defined tasks and roles.Project design intentionally supports productive group interactions through various strategies (i.e., contracts, check-ins, peer evaluations, feedback loops, etc.). Students engage in cooperative learning activities that promote productive interdependence, individual accountability and positive interaction among the students.Project design intentionally supports group interactions through various strategies and incorporates conflict resolution strategies as needed.
1.10 Culture Includes strategies for connecting to student interests and motivation at a group level.  Students are given limited choices in content and/or ways of demonstrating learning. 

 

 

Shows deliberate strategies for building motivation and interest in learning aimed at both group and individual levels.Students are given a voice in planning instruction/learning. Shows evidence of building a learning community where students are empowered and take responsibility for their learning.
1.11 Reflection Candidate indicates what he/she has learned about his/her progress in relation to the artifacts with no indication to how it impacts his/her PBL practice.Recommendations for future implementation are appropriate and address instructional changes based on the analyses of project planning and instruction. Little or no evidence of strategies for future implementation is given. Candidate indicates what he/she has learned about his/her progress in relation to the artifacts but depth of thought regarding the implications of his/her PBL practice is weak.Recommendations for future implementation are aligned to the instructional changes based on the analyses of project planning and instruction. Uses artifacts appropriately to illustrate strategies for future implementation (e.g., revision of lessons). Candidate indicates what he/she has learned about his/her progress in relation to the artifacts with the depth of thought regarding the implications of his/her PBL practice.Recommendations for future implementation are integral to the instructional changes based on the analyses of project planning and instruction. Uses artifacts effectively to illustrate strategies for future implementation.Synthesis of work shows ability to constantly reflect and improve teacher performance. 

 

Domain 2: Project Assessment
2.1 & 2.2. Formative & Summative Assessments Assessment plan includes submission of appropriate sample student work and a variety of appropriate formal and informal assessments.Criteria are aligned with learning targets; rubric shows evidence of qualitative measures.Only product is culminating exhibition or presentation.  Assessment plan includes submission of appropriate sample student work and a variety of formal and informal assessments that are targeted to assess students’ progress toward learning targets.There is some evidence of structured self and/or peer assessment opportunities (i.e., journals, peer conferences, teacher or mentor conferences, rubrics).Students receive frequent feedback on their works-in-progress from teachers, mentors, and/or peers.The project includes multiple products, and all products are aligned with outcomes.

Culminating products allow students to demonstrate individual and collaborative growth.

 

 

 

Assessment plan includes submission of appropriate sample student work and a variety of formal and informal assessments that are targeted to assess continuous student progress toward learning targets.There is strong evidence that self and peer assessments are integrated into daily practice.Students receive frequent and timely feedback on their works-in-progress from teachers, mentors, and peers.Assessments tightly align to learning outcomes and the project design.

 

Culminating products allow students to demonstrate individual and collaborative growth and focus on transfer of content knowledge/skills to new situations.

2.3 Community Partnerships Students have no contacts with adults outside of school OR students share their final products with audience members who have not had significant involvement throughout the project. The final product is a culminating exhibition or presentation that demonstrates students’ ability to apply the knowledge & skills they have gained.Community partners who have had limited involvement in the project provide feedback based on real-world standards from their fields. The final product is a culminating exhibition or presentation in front on an informed audience which addresses an authentic challenge posed by the audience.Community partners who have played an integral role throughout the project provide feedback and/or contribute to the final evaluation.
2.4 21st Century Skills (Critical thinking, communication, collaboration, technology use, innovation, self-direction, persistence)  A few 21st Century Skills are assessed, either formatively or summatively, though the assessment plan does not indicate the criteria for these assessments and/or how they contribute significantly in the overall evaluation of the project. Intentionally selected 21st Century Skills are assessed both formatively and summatively throughout the project. Development of these skills is monitored, criteria are clearly communicated, and progress is evaluated throughout the project.The targeted 21st Century Skills align with the content knowledge outcomes and contribute significantly in the overall evaluation of the project. Intentionally selected 21st Century Skills are assessed both formatively and summatively throughout the project. Development of these skills is monitored, criteria are clearly communicated, and progress is evaluated throughout the project.The targeted 21st Century Skills align with the content knowledge outcomes and contribute significantly in the overall evaluation of the project. Opportunities to improve on 21st Century Skills for self, peer, teacher, and mentor/audience feedback are provided. The assessment plan indicates opportunities for both individual and group assessments of growth.
2.5 Reflection Candidate indicates what he/she has learned about his/her progress in relation to the artifacts with no indication to how it impacts his/her PBL practice.Reflections address instructional issues in terms of learning targets.  The analyses are accurate but limited in the number and depth of instructional choices.The reflection identifies strategies for improving student learning and focuses mostly on the whole group rather than individual learner needs.Analysis of student work focuses on growth toward learning targets.  Some examples of student performance are provided to support analyses. Feedback to students tends to be general.

 

Candidate indicates what he/she has learned about his/her progress in relation to the artifacts but depth of thought regarding the implications of his/her PBL practice is weak.Reflections address student learning targets thoughtfully and accurately.  A  range of instructional choices are provided.The reflection identifies strategies for improving student learning and addresses both whole group and individual needs.Analysis of student learning focuses on growth toward learning goals.  Analyses are focused and provide information to support student learning towards learning objectives.  Specific feedback helps students understand own strengths and weaknesses.

 

Candidate indicates what he/she has learned about his/her progress in relation to the artifacts with the depth of thought regarding the implications of his/her PBL practice.Candidate continuously evaluates instructional effectiveness and student needs based on data.  Decisions are integrated into daily and future planning.Throughout units’ lessons, reflections provide consistent evidence of thoughtful and accurate reflection of instruction and student learning.Analysis of student learning reflects individual’s progress towards learning targets and personal learning goals.  Specific feedback empowers students to set and meet personal learning targets.

 

Domain 3: Professional Culture/ Teacher Leadership
3.1 Teacher Leadership The candidate participates in PBL professional development activities. The candidate participates in ongoing, PBL-related professional development activities and leads PBL professional development activities within department or team settings. The candidate participates in ongoing, PBL-related professional development activities and leads PBL professional development activities across the school, district, or community.
3.2 Participation in PBL Network Communities The candidate participates in professional growth opportunities in networks outside of the school. The candidate participates in professional growth opportunities in networks outside of the school and actively uses networked resources to inform instruction. The candidate participates in professional growth opportunities in networks outside of the school, actively uses networked resources to inform instruction, and continuously seeks out and creates PBL resources for their school community.
3.3 Reflection The candidate provides specific, and generally realistic plans for continued growth in demonstrating teacher leadership. The candidate provides specific, realistic plans for continued growth in demonstrating teacher leadership. The candidate provides specific, realistic plans for continued growth in demonstrating teacher leadership, and includes plans to advance the PBL community forward
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